Museo Galileo
italiano
previous
Virtual Museum
Section of Interactive Rooms
 Time and Space

Basically, longitude is calculated by measuring time and observing astronomical phenomena. Galileo tried to solve this problem by observing the motion of Jupiter's satellites and applying a pendulum to a mechanical clock.

He determined the motion of the satellites - illustrated in real time by the Jupiterium built by Officine Panerai - using an instrument of his own invention, called the Jovilabe. A touch screen lets visitors use this instrument virtually.

The operation of the pendulum clock is illustrated by an enlarged reproduction of the timekeeper designed by Galileo and by a mechanical model that compares Galileo's circular pendulum with the cycloidal pendulum.

Very large models of escapements, which can be directly actuated, show how mechanical clocks operate.

Objects
Jupiterium

Jupiterium

Officine Panerai, 2009

Jovilabe (touch screen)

Jovilabe (touch screen)

Museo Galileo - Multimedia Laboratory, 2012

Pendulum clock

Pendulum clock

Centro di Studi e Restauro per la valorizzazione di orologi antichi e strumentaria storico-scientifica - ITIS Leonardo da Vinci, Florence, 2009

Circular pendulum and cycloidal pendulum

Circular pendulum and cycloidal pendulum

Centro di Studi e Restauro per la valorizzazione di orologi antichi e strumentaria storico-scientifica - ITIS Leonardo da Vinci, Florence, 2011

Verge escapement with foliot regulator

Verge escapement with foliot regulator

Centro di Studi e Restauro per la valorizzazione di orologi antichi e strumentaria storico-scientifica - ITIS Leonardo da Vinci, Florence, 2011

Free anchor escapement

Free anchor escapement

Centro di Studi e Restauro per la valorizzazione di orologi antichi e strumentaria storico-scientifica - ITIS Leonardo da Vinci, Florence, 2011

Cylinder escapement with flywheel regulator

Cylinder escapement with flywheel regulator

Centro di Studi e Restauro per la valorizzazione di orologi antichi e strumentaria storico-scientifica - ITIS Leonardo da Vinci, Florence, 2011